MD4: The Disruptive Power of Google Glass Technology

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The Disruptive Power of Google Glass

The disruptive technology that I am discussing in this post is Google Glass. According to Hodgson (2015) it was actually “introduced and explored as a beta product in 2013 and was meant to be the next evolution in mobile computing” (para, 1). So it was actually meant to displace the smartphone. According to Hodgson (2015) Johnson, Becker, and Freeman, 2014 it “aimed at the displacement of smartphones and enhancement of smartphone features due to the convenience of wearing, rather than carrying, the device” (para, 1).

Hodgson gave a very good explanation for this technology being a disruptive technology and I would like to provide that example here. According to Ahier (as cited in Hodgson 2015) “at UC San Francisco cardiothoracic surgeon Pierre Theodore, MD is using Google Glass during surgery, pre-loads CT and X-ray images needed for a procedure, and calls them up in his Google Glass to compare a medical scan with the actual surgical site” (para,2), now Hodgson himself, further explains that “however along with these social benefits, social problems also emerged as people cited privacy as a major concern in public situations where data could be captured without the knowledge of those around the wearer of the technology. The same is true of education, it cannot be assumed that all students automatically agree for their images to be captured and potentially stored and re-published without their express consent” (Hodgson, para, 2, 2015).

The next successor emerging from this Google Glass Product should already be in production and it is the smart contact lens, featuring the Google Glass “but powered by the heat of the human eye, in the next 5 to 10 years it looks like this will be the new standard in capturing live data”(Hodgson, 2015, para, 4).

 

References

Hodgson, P., (2015). The Disruptive Power of Google Glass. Retrieved from https://www.paulhodgson.me/blog/emerging-and-future-tech/the-disruptive-power-of-google-glass/

Johnson, L., Becker, S., Estrada, V., & Freeman, A. (2014). Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education. Retrieved from http://www.editlib.org/p/130341/  http://www.editlib.org/p/130341/report_130341.pdf

 

Links to Other Google Glass Articles

Ahier, B. (2014). Google Glass could be a powerful tool for disruptive innovation in healthcare. Retrieved October 22, 2015, from http://www.govhealthit.com/blog/google-glass-could-be-powerful-tool-disruptive-innovation-healthcare

Johnson, L., Becker, S., Estrada, V., & Freeman, A. (2014). Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education. Retrieved from http://www.editlib.org/p/130341/ http://www.editlib.org/p/130341/report_130341.pdf

Oliver, K. (2015). Google Glass 2: Everything you need to know. Retrieved October 22, 2015, from http://www.techradar.com/news/wearables/google-glass-2-release-date-price-features-1300484

Parviz, B. (2009). Augmented Reality in a Contact Lens. Retrieved October 22, 2015, from http://spectrum.ieee.org/biomedical/bionics/augmented-reality-in-a-contact-lens

Whitwam, R. (2015). Google exec: Here’s where Glass went wrong. Retrieved October 22, 2015, from http://www.extremetech.com/mobile/201513-google-exec-heres-where-glass-went-wrong

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2 thoughts on “MD4: The Disruptive Power of Google Glass Technology

  1. A good post Joanie. You have outlined some important use of Google Glass such as during surgery, where surgeons pre-loads CT and X-ray images needed for a procedure, and calls them up in their Google Glass to compare a medical scan with the actual surgical site”. As much as I think glass has an incredible potential in advancement of technology, Google must address some key issues for it to succeed. It courses distraction when outside information (audio/visual) gets on the way of the task at hand. Google class has privacy issues where users record other people without them noticing, unlike regular camera or cell phone which are easy to notice when they are in use. I also believe that the Glass will promote unsocial behavior such as being distracted and users over glued to the device even in social places. Currently the price of Google Glass is very high and only people who want specific applications of the garget will be interested in buying it. If price, available apps, privacy concerns and objections, and user comfort issues can be worked out, Google Glass may sell and become as popular as smart phones when they were first introduced. Or, in five years it may simply be a laughable memory.

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  2. Interesting post, Joanie. I have come to believe that technology will eventually change the idea of privacy. Without technology, people make observations and report them to others, without any permission. Such reports may involve bias and so skew the interpretation of the original event. With technology, the event can be captured, in context, and shared more accurately. Your statement about Google contact lens reminds me of the Canadian filmmaker, Rob Spence, who replaced his prosthetic eye with a camera (Hornyak, 2010).

    Reference
    Hornyak T. (2010, June 11). Eyeborg: Man Replaces False Eye with Bionic Camera [Web log]. Retrieved from http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/biomedical/bionics/061110-eyeborg-bionic-eye

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